Track Record/London Boroughs

Developer/Enfield/New Build/ Infill Development in North London

At the rear of a residential care home in North London was an unpromising site with a fine Southerly aspect, but a steep and inaccessible slope. HEAT have developed an innovative design for six new substantial terraced houses which have just received the blessing of Enfield Council at the Planning pre-application stage. The houses have been designed to meet the highest standards of accessibility and energy conservation and each is over 2000 sq ft with a dedicated garage. The design of the upper floors and the set back gables allow us to incorporate a third floor within the massing of the building.

Project 165

Won/10.12.14

Developer/New Build/Wandsworth/ New Houses in Clapham

Spencer Park in Wandsworth is a gem with large villas backing onto green lawns and tennis courts on three sides. Our developer clients proposed a new house on a sensitive infill site between two existing houses. Two previous applications had been turned down and HEAT were able to successfully negotiate a planning consent for a new brick house with stone detailing and a modern take on the Dutch Gable (Seen here under construction). One of the existing houses next door was converted from a business use to residential providing over 11,000 sq ft of new residential property in this prime part of Southwest London.

Won/24.10.14

Kensington & Chelsea/Listed Building/ Holland Park Listed Building

HEAT worked with the local conservation team in Kensington and Chelsea to come up with a transformation of a stunning two storey maisonette in Holland Park. Listed building consent was necessary to re-plan the layout of a flat that had been converted without much thought in the 1960’s. Four bedrooms, each with a private en-suite bathroom and air conditioning were created at the top floor level, whilst on the lower floor, the rooms were connected so that family room leads to kitchen, which leads to the dining room, which leads to the main reception room, making a fantastic family home.

Project 161

Won/15.05.14

Developer/Listed Building/Westminster/ New Flat in Harley Street

The basements of the C18th Houses in Harley Street are nearly all used for Doctor’s consulting rooms, and when the lease expired on this particularly tired one, our clients decided to return it to residential use. HEAT obtained planning and listed building consent for a straightforward scheme, that, nevertheless required several measures against damp including tanking throughout, ventilation to all the rooms with heat reclamation and a new concrete slab with underfloor heating. In the end the basement and ground floor provided two dry and pleasant two bedroom flats for rental investment.

Project 152

Won/25.02.14

Listed Building/Westminster/ Listed Interior in Belgravia

HEAT have successfully negotiated permission from Westminster Council for the complete restoration of a Grade II listed interior by Thomas Cubitt. Eaton Place was constructed in “divisions” between 1828 and 1850 and the interior of this beautiful stucco-fronted townhouse had been gutted in successive redevelopments in the 1980’s. There was little original documentation – we found the original plans and layouts in a French architectural magazine of 1855 and some interior photographs recording wartime damage. Through research we were able to track down the original moulds for the decorative plasterwork and we are recreating the original joinery; window shutters, doors, skirtings and architraves.

The floors will be relaid in solid oak boards spanning the length of the room and fixed directly to the joists to provide a feeling of authenticity and permanence.  A new staircase is required and since this is a modern element, without historical precedent, it will be expressed as a modern feature with an elegant helical design that harmonises with the interior.

Stunning modernist furnishings and artworks, sourced by designer Michael Lewis will complete the interior space.

Project 168

Won/29.01.14

Westminster/ Pimlico Planning Win

Pimlico, in the City of Westminster is an area of attractive mid-Victorian terraced houses which retain their original regular urban plan. HEAT have won a valuable planning consent for a mansard roof extension and a two storey infill extension at the rear.

Two solar panels are to be fitted to the roof to enhance the sustainability of the project and a number of external enhancements were proposed as part of the application, such as restoring missing balustrading to the front elevation. The planning authority judged that these enhancements will make a positive contribution to the Pimlico Conservation Area.

The dramatic interiors are designed to display the owners’ collection of Art Deco furniture and lighting

Project 167

Won/21.09.13

Listed Building/Westminster/ Knightsbridge Planning Success

We had an opportunity to carry out in depth research on the history of this beautiful late Regency house in Knightsbridge, which whilst being listed Grade II, was a blank canvas internally following unsympathetic conversions in the 1980’s.

Together with Dr Chris Miele of Montagu Evans we prepared an authoritative documentation of the story of the house and its occupants which gave us the confidence to propose an audacious restoration of the original plasterwork, joinery and detailing and new additions including a new floor at roof level, an exquisitely detailed glass extension at the rear and a new basement under the front garden.

Project 156

Won/09.07.13

Developer/Merton/New Build/Planning Appeal/ Appeal Success in Wimbledon

HEAT’s design for a new family house in Wimbledon was described as a “sensitive design solution” by the appeal inspector in a landmark decision this week. The inspector has overturned the decision of the London Borough of Merton to refuse permission for the demolition and rebuilding of this three storey house. The developer’s case was that the house was in such poor condition that it made a negative contribution to the Conservation Area and they proposed sensitively rebuilding the front facade to match the existing, whilst constructing a new contemporary house behind the facade. The inspector stated that “The appellants’ articulate and well-documented statements submitted with their applications present a convincing case as to why the original dwelling does not make a positive contribution to the CA.” The inspector “saw no evidence to demonstrate that the Council had been willing to enter into constructive dialogue after the applications had been submitted despite the voluminous and credible information it had received and requests to meet”, found that the Council’s behaviour was unreasonable and made a full award of costs on behalf of our clients.

Project 159

Won/01.02.13

Barnet/Developer/ New Home in North London

Our developer clients in North London had a triangular piece of land at the rear of one of their properties that was detached from the rest of the garden. HEAT have designed a stunning two-storey family home for this sensitive site. To reduce the impact of the development the volumes are broken up into two brick gabled volumes linked with a lightweight glazed bridge which provides all the circulation. The effect is to create a five bedroom 3000 sq ft house with integrated garage, but to make it appear less significant in the streetscape. A mature English oak in the garden has been retained, providing shading from the Southerly aspect in the summer.

Project 164

Won/25.01.13

Islington/ Islington House Transformed

HEAT have achieved success in a tricky planning application to rebuild a rear extension in a sensitive street in Islington; adding a floor to the rear extension and creating a full width extension at the lower level. This image shows the rear of the house before and after. The alterations required conservation area consent and consent for tree works from Islington Council and HEAT had to calculate the effect of the extension on the neighbours’ sunlight and daylighting. The house was completely transformed internally; where it had been narrow and dark, planes of glass bring in borrowed light and create a sense of space. The staircase was rebuilt so that the ceiling in the opened out basement could be flat. As project architect Michael Feinberg says “This was a tricky three dimensional jigsaw puzzle  requiring very careful detailing and accurate construction, but the end result is a transformation”.

Project 154

Won/07.05.12